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Crime

Evidence – circumstantial evidence

There was strong circumstantial evidence and A’s robbery conviction was upheld by the Court of Appeal. A appealed his robbery conviction for which he was sentenced to a term of five years’ imprisonment. He denied being involved in the robbery.

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Manslaughter – duty of care

A, who ran an Indian restaurant, was convicted of manslaughter when a customer died after eating a meal containing substantial amounts of peanuts. The victim, knowing he had an allergy to peanuts, had been specifically told by a waiter that it contained no nuts.

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Evidence – good character

In this useful article, the author examines issues relating to good character following the Court of Appeal ruling in R v Green [2017]. In that case, the judge drew attention to the complainant’s good character in his summing up, telling the jury that there was a level playing field as far as character was concerned. The author says this diminished the effect of D’s good character.

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Defences – general defences

The author provides a useful summary of general defences available to defendants in light of recent case law. For instance, self-defence can potentially be a defence to allegations of both dangerous and careless driving, recognising that there may be a need for responsive force in particular circumstances.

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Sentencing – modern slavery

Practitioners defending or prosecuting sexual offences in the modern slavery context will welcome new guidance on sentencing.

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Offences – public order

What is a ‘dwelling’ for the purposes of the Public Order Act 1986 (POA)? The author of this article analyses two issues concerning public order offences in detail: the extent of the meaning of ’dwelling’; and public order offences generally.

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Procedure – hearsay

D successfully appealed his conviction on two counts of kidnapping, for which he was sentenced to four years in prison. Despite being married, D had had a relationship with a woman which had ended some time before the incident in question. On the relevant date, the woman (his ex-partner) was in her flat and a male friend was staying over that night on the sofa.

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Manslaughter – foreseeability

In assessing reasonable foreseeability of serious and obvious risk of death in cases of gross negligence manslaughter, it was not appropriate to take into account what a reasonable person in D’s position would have known but for theirbreach of duty.  

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Corporate crime – privilege

The appellant unsuccessfully appealed a conviction for failing in his duty to take reasonable care of the health and safety of employees, under s7 Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974.

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Procedure – corporate crime

Criminal practitioners need to ensure that they are prepared for key changes in force from 2 April 2018.

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